Chile poblano and pomegranate season: Chiles Rellenos en Nogada

Hello all, Amy here. Every year in the late summer or early fall, I end up with pomegranates and fresh green poblano chiles at the same moment, and need to make Chiles en Nogada. The huge, green (but this time blushing red!) poblano chiles were from Tucson CSA/Crooked Sky Farms and a CSA member brought in the pomegranates from their bush at home.

There are many filling options for chiles rellenos (singular: chile relleno) but I love a traditional picadillo for this dish. I started by cooking ground pork with onion, garlic, and whole cumin. But beef, or a mix of the two, is good, too.

Then I spiced the meat with ground coriander seed, cinnamon, Mexican oregano, tomato, raisins, slivered almonds and green olives.

Charring fresh chiles over an open flame smells so wonderful! After evenly blackening the chiles, place them in a paper bag or saucepan with a lid as they cool and sweat off their skins. Peel without rinsing, as few pieces of skin are not worth watering down the chile’s flavor. While I was already making a mess on the stove top, I roasted a few chiles for other projects. Of course any chile or bell pepper could be used with this filling, so use what you have. Chile poblano, to some people at least, is the fresh version of chile ancho. I always add a disclaimer since chile nomenclature varies, and different chiles get different names and some names are used for different chiles!

Slit each chile and remove the core and seeds while keeping the stem and the rest of the chile as intact as possible. Stuff the chile with the meat.

For the sauce, soak about one cup walnuts in water.

Then drain and liquify in a blender with about one cup Mexican crema or sour cream and half a pound of queso fresco.

Salt to taste and adjust with a little water or more cheese or nuts to taste. Make plenty of this cooling sauce in case one of the chiles is very spicy! Top with sauce immediately before eating and garnish with plenty of pomegranate arils (seeds).

Unlike the fried version, this dish is great served hot, warm or room temperature, which it makes is good to serve a crowd. Another time I’ll post my great grandmother’s battered and fried version that is famous for a reason, but they need to be eaten as they are made. Also, when you have pomegranates, make this one. !Buen provecho!

 

 

Categories: Cooking, fruit, heirloom crops, Mexican Food, Sonoran Native, Southwest Food, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

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7 thoughts on “Chile poblano and pomegranate season: Chiles Rellenos en Nogada

  1. I think I missed whether you cook the meat mixture and the stuff the chile? Also do you then bake the whole thing? THX, Sandy

    On Mon, Oct 22, 2018, 7:49 AM Savor the Southwest: wrote:

    > Savor Blog Partners posted: ” Hello all, Amy here. Every year in the late > summer or early fall, I end up with pomegranates and fresh green poblano > chiles at the same moment, and need to make Chiles en Nogada. The huge, > green (but this time blushing red!) poblano chiles were from T” >

    • Hello Sandy, Amy here. Thank you for writing for clarifications; I’ll edit the post accordingly. Yes, the meat is cooked in a pan with the spices, tomato, raisins, almonds, and olives before stuffing the chile. Since everything is already cooked, and the stuffed chiles are good warm or at room temperature, I’ve never baked them.

  2. Looks amazing!

  3. I’ve made the stuffed chiles but never knew how to make the sauce. Thanks for this recipe. I could eat these every other day.

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