Preserving the Harvest

cook pot 1804760_1280Back in the day, the only way to preserve a harvest was to dry it. This is why grains, seeds, and nuts are popular crops and so entrenched cultures around the world for thousands of years. Meat could be dried or salted, but was most often eaten fresh.  Then, roughly 200 years ago, preserving food through canning began to be developed. We think of canning as a pioneer tradition, but it only became common in homes roughly 150 years ago.

jam 2091026_1280I am lucky enough to have learned canning from my grandmother (back in the last century). She was extra careful to follow the Extension Service guidelines for how long to process the food she canned because a childhood friend of hers got botulism from improperly canned food (we are talking about back in 1911 here).

pressure canning book

Jump to this century and the book – Modern Pressure Canning by Amelia Jeanroy (Voyageur Press $24.99). This volume is a shining gem of how to can – especially if you did not have someone’s elbow to learn at. If you already know how to can, this book is still useful to help you improve your technique, plus offer some tantalizing recipes to try. The beautiful photographs of the food, done by the talented photographer Kerry Michaels don’t hurt either.

green beans 631157_1280

The chapter “Storage, Troubleshooting and Other Considerations” elevate this book from a “how to” to a “must have.” Among other tips, Amelia urges you to keep records. She shares the fact that with the help of such written records she determined what her family uses the most, and now she concentrates on that.

pressure cooker cc 3.0

I have resisted canning with a pressure cooker, because I was concerned about adjusting for altitude correctly. Amelia has solved this problem by including (on page 29) exactly what pressures to use at what elevation. That chart, plus the recipes, have me eyeballing the garden and dreaming of home-grown and home-canned harvest – months after the harvest.

Pickled sweet peppers with onion & garlic in an anise, peppercorn, and coriander brine M King web

Pickled sweet peppers with onion and garlic in an anise, peppercorn, and coriander brine, made by Monica King

Jacqueline Soule business portrait. Tucson, AZ. © 2012 Mark Turner

Jacqueline Soule

Want to learn more about growing your own food? Look for my free lectures at your local Pima County Library branch, Tubac Presidio, Tucson Festival of Books and other venues. After each event I will sell and sign copies of my books, including Southwest Fruit and Vegetable Gardening (Cool Springs Press, $23).
© Article copyright by Jacqueline A. Soule. All rights reserved. Republishing an entire blog post or article is prohibited without permission. I receive many requests to reprint my work. My policy is that you may use a short excerpt but you must give proper credit to the author, and must include a link back to the original post on our site. Photos may not be used.

Categories: Cooking, fruit, Gardening | Tags: , , | 5 Comments

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5 thoughts on “Preserving the Harvest

  1. I’ve been canning up a storm lately, trying to keep up with the potager’s productivity. Great photo, and an informative post. Hugs!

  2. We used to have a very well stocked panty of canned food. Much of it was apple sauce and apple juice that was traded for food that we lacked. It was lost along with the home, and we have not yet restored it. I am so pleased that one of the young men at work wants to learn about canning. Besides the produce that is grown in the garden, there are blackberries and elderberries growing wild out in the forest. There is also a LOT of food that gets discarded from the big kitchen at work.

    • I just love to make jam. Don’t have a pressure cooker anymore so I don’t can, but simply using all the citrus available in Tucson in the summer makes me feel like I’m doing my part.

  3. Carolyn Niethammer

    I just love to make jam, but only manage to grow enough vegetables to feed us day by day although I have canned quarts of tomatoes when I find a really good deal. The high sugar in jam and the high acid in tomatoes make them less risky for a not-quite-perfect job.

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